I’ve fallen behind and I can’t get caught up

Perhaps I was wrong; maybe you can take too many photos.

Hard to believe I’m still posting about Spring when Summer is half over.  I’ve been so busy enjoying summer on Mt Rainier I haven’t had time to sit down in front of my computer and work on photos of things I’ve already done.  

The most time-consuming part of posting photos is deciding which photos to post and which to discard, especially when the camera is set to shoot rapidly.  I have to delete at least nine photos for every photo I post, and often the differences are so subtle it takes a while to decide which is the best — at least in my mind.

If I had any pride, I might be embarrassed by how far I’ve fallen behind. Instead, I’m reminded how much I enjoyed Spring long after the Oregon Grape flowers have faded, 

Oregon Grape

and the Yellow-Rumped Warblers

 

Yellow-Rumped Warbler

and Hermit Thrushes

Hermit Thrush

have headed North to their breeding ground.

The  Marsh Wrens haven’t gone anywhere, but they have retreated to the sedges and reeds rather than boldly advertising for mates as they do in Spring.

Marsh Wren

Spring is probably my favorite time of year and with Summer seemingly arriving earlier every year in the Pacific Northwest, Spring has become even more precious, too beautiful to be gone so soon.

Spring’s Gone

I know at times I sound like a broken record, but, as in years past, I truly believe that Western Washington is the most beautiful place in the world during Rhododendron season.  You can’t drive a street in the city without being struck by their beauty, but I never settle for just seeing them in neighbors’ yards.  

Rhododendrons are at their best in woodlands,

Rhody in Bloom against forest

and, luckily, the Point Defiance Rhododendron Garden is just a short mile away. It’s an added bonus that the walk is a gentle way to start getting ready to hike on Mt. Rainier once the snow has receded.

I always end up taking a lot more pictures than I’m ever going to process and post; so the hardest part of posting them is deciding which ones I like best.  

Do you  prefer pink and white, 

Pink and White Rhody

purple and orange, 

Purple and Red Rhody

seen from above

Looking down on Rhody

or a deep red?

Deep Red Rhody

Or do you prefer some of those I’ve posted in previous years (the ones in the links down below) ?  

Luckily, you can never have too much beauty in your life.

Dune Peninsula

Judging from the amount of space I devote on this website to our vacations, you might assume that we spend much of our retired life visiting wildlife refuges.  (Un)fortunately, as much as I would like to lead that lifestyle, it ain’t true.  At times I actually feel like I spend most of my retirement sitting at the computer working on blog entries, but looking back at the calendar to see how few posts I have made that’s obviously not true, either. In fact, I’m never sure where all the time went, just that it went a lot faster than I ever thought it would.

Our regular routine in the rainy season includes three days working out at the YMCA, which we occasionally supplement with walks in nearby Pt. Defiance or trips to local wildlife areas.  One of our favorite walks in late Spring or early Summer is at the Dunes,  a new extension of Pt. Defiance Park is named after Frank Herbert.

Built on the ruins of a historic lead-and-copper smelter it is covered with “prairie grasses and flowers,”  and most of those flowers are at their prime in early spring.  The trail from the upper parking lot is filled with these striking Rhododendrons.

Rhododendron

Rhododendrons are native to Washington, but I don’t think these are a native variety. 

Common Hollyhocks line the trail section that overlooks the marina.

Hollyhock

If you can take your eyes off the beautiful flowers, and it’s clear enough, you can see Mt. Rainier in the distance lording over Point Ruston.

Mt Rainier from Dune Peninsula

You know it’s a good day here whenever you can see The Mountain.

You can also find flowers like Columbine

Columbine

and Tough Leaved Iris

Tough-Leaved Iris

on the Dune Peninsula Pavilion.

We usually finish our two-mile walk by going back through the Japanese Garden.  That’s twice as far as we usually walk at the Y, but only seems half as long.  

Goodbye to Colorado

Time to finish up our trip to Colorado before I forget that we actually visited there.  We arrived early for Zoe’s graduation so that we could see Sydney’s state tournament.  It turned out to be a bit of a disappointing day, mainly because Sydney’s team lost the game, ending their run.  To make it even more disappointing, though, I didn’t get many decent shots because I took the wrong lens to the game.  I brought a birding telephoto lens instead of a zoom lens.  So, during the first half, Jen wanted me to take some pictures at Zoe’s graduation, but I didn’t feel comfortable standing up or walking around during the ceremony even if it was outside.  After 30 years of attending high school graduations, I see them as a formal event, not a celebration, though that is what they seem to have become. I couldn’t get a single shot of Sydney.  I did manage a few shots in the second half where she was a lot further away, but more often than not she was blocked out by other players.  It was a disappointing way to be reminded how often you left the wrong lens at home.

We only got one more chance to take pictures on our trip.  Jen, Tyson, and Logan took us for a walk where we saw Snowy Egrets

and a small flock of White Pelicans, coincidently one of Jen’s favorite birds. They obliged us by landing right in front of us

and flying so close over our head that I couldn’t fit the whole Pelican in the frame.

It was a nice way to end our trip, especially after failing so miserably on taking pictures of the soccer game.