A Favorite Distraction from Yardwork

I’ve spent the last month and a half transforming my backyard into a garden that I really like and not a nondescript, weed-infested lawn I’m forced to mow regularly. It’s been a tough job made easier by the help of grandkids, particularly Lael who has spent nearly a hundred hours helping us.

The worst part of the job, though, has been missing so many opportunities to birding. I’ll admit to having cabin fever. Luckily, throughout most of that time hummingbirds have been constant visitors, ignoring the clutter to visit their beloved Red Lucifer Crocosmia.

Luckily they were persistent enough that they would stay around when we took a break and I could go get a camera.

Heck, when the Crocosmia was nearly done blooming, a male would sit on the plant refusing to leave his cache.

Nothing lasts forever, of course, so when the deer had finished eating the outside flowers and the rest had stopped blooming, the hummingbirds switched over to the sage plant, which will bloom until late Fall.

Willets in Action

Although I’ve seen many Willets on the ocean shore in both Washington and California, I didn’t have any idea what it was when first confronted by one in Malheur. When I saw one flying by, I got out of the car and tried to capture it in flight. That turned out to be a lot easier to do than expected because instead of flying away as most birds do, “it,” and as it turned out, “they,” flew directly over my head several times, protesting constantly until the first one landed nearby and glared at me. I lost track of the first bird when a second Willet appeared, flying even closer than the first had flown and complained even louder until it, too, landed on nearby sagebrush. At that point it took off to join the first bird as they retreated into the heavy brush. A little online research indicates that Willets spend the winter on the coastline but nest in grasslands and prairies near fresh water.

Red Knots at Bottle Beach

It might say something about how bad of a “Birder” I am that it never occurred to me to check what birds were being seen at Bottle Beach before I went there. But, as I’ve said before, I go to magical places that draw me, not to see specific birds. As a result, I didn’t know that endangered Red Knots had been seen in the area and that birders were especially on the lookout for them.

In fact, I didn’t learn that until the second day when an excited birder with a scope reported that he had counted over 300 Red Knots on the shore. Although I had focused on the Ruddy Turnstones and Dunlin, I had mentioned to Leslie the first day that some of the birds sure looked like Red Knots, not Dowitcher’s in breeding plumage, though they are similar in size and some Dowitchers are nearly as bright as Red Knots.

As it turned out, when I got home and looked at my shots, I had taken lots of shots of Red Knots

on the first day simply because they are a beautiful bird, and big enough that they’re impossible to ignore in a flock of shorebirds.

Dunlins are larger than most sandpipers, and this Red Knot is nearly twice the size of the resting Dunlin.

Not to mention that Red Knots are quite striking in flight and seem to fly a lot even while feeding.

Most of all, though, it was their beautiful color, especially when the sun was behind me that produced shots like this

[

and this.

Semipalmated Plovers

It’s easy to confuse Semipalmated Plovers with Killdeer since they’re about the same size and have similar coloring. However, I found it so hard to believe that the Semipalmated Plover was related to the larger and very differently colored Black-Bellied Plover that I featured yesterday that I had to look up the definition of “plover” which, as it turned out, seemed vague enough to cover both species: “a short-billed gregarious wading bird, typically found by water but sometimes frequenting grassland, tundra, and mountains.” Unlike sandpipers, plovers spot food and then run to catch it, rather than probing the sand for food, a characteristic that stands out on the beach.

When Leslie first saw the Semipalmated Plover she told me she had seen a Killdeer in a with a flock of Western Sandpipers. When I heard that I started looking for Semipalmated Plovers since I had made the same mistake the first time I had spotted a Semipalmated Plover.

We ended up seeing more Semipalmated Plovers than I have ever seen in one place before, and they weren’t particularly shy.

It doesn’t hurt that they usually pause after a brief sprint before they start running again.

Once they find food, they’re positively indifferent to photographers with large lenses.

The One that Got Away

Having grown up fishing, I often compare birding to fishing. If that’s true, then this is the one I hooked but got away. It is impossible to miss Black-Bellied Plovers when observing shorebirds because they are usually one of the biggest birds on the beach and their startling black-and-white plumage is impossible to miss.

There were two Black-Bellied Plovers on the far side of this large flock of shorebirds.

Black-Bellied Plovers generally keep their distance. This, for instance, is a heavily cropped shot, which explains its lack of detail.

I managed to get closer to this one, but it kept walking away for me,

and took off as I approached.

, I’d love to show you the great shot I got of a Black-Bellied Plover, but I must have accidentally deleted it on my first screening of the shots I'd taken.