And a Belted Kingfisher, Too

When strangers ask me if I’m a bird photographer, my usual reply is that I’m a wildlife photographer and that birds are just the easiest form of wildlife to find. Of course, I’m not really a wildlife photographer, either. Maybe I come closest to being a nature photographer, at least if you count people as part of nature.

If I were a wildlife photographer, though, my favorite subject would have to be River Otters, and, conveniently, we observed a river otter laying on the dock at Fort Worden precisely where we saw the river otter family the last time we visited. This one seemed to be enjoying a recent meal laying in the warm sunshine.

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Of course, you can only take so many pictures of a sleeping otter, so I went to the other side of the dock to see what else might be around. Before long I noticed an otter swimming out into the sound, diving,

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and looking around when it surfaced.

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Eventually I tired of waiting for it to resurface, and I went back to birding. When I walked around the building, Leslie pointed out that the otter had returned with a meal.

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I must admit I was a little surprised how well this “river” otter adapted to the Puget Sound.

To cap the whole wonderful day off, I also got a shot of Port Townsend’s resident Belted Kingfisher resting on exactly the same pier he was resting on a month ago when we were here.

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3 thoughts on “And a Belted Kingfisher, Too

  1. Well done! Kingfishers are among the most difficult birds to capture on film, at least when I try. They tend to fly away and into trees where they can stay mostly out of sight. River otters, cute as they often are when resting or playing, do have a a fierce side as well.

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