Third Anniversary

Today was another beautiful day, but like last week there weren’t many birds out and about and those that were visible seemed to be content to lay around in the shadows even at 7:30 in the morning.

I was feeling a little sorry for myself when about three-fourths of the way around the outside trail, I saw an old friend, or at least a bird that reminded me of an old friend because I was never formally introduced.

White Goose

But it’s hard to miss this white goose standing guard in the middle of a flock of Canada Geese. Suddenly it hit me that this was precisely what I saw the first time I toured Nisquallly on July 30, 2005, almost three years ago to the day.

I suddenly remembered that Canada Geese and Great Blue Heron dominated the landscape when I first visited, but then I was thrilled by the pictures I got, even though I doubt any of them was a better picture than this one:

Great Blue Heron

I’ve probably mentioned this before, but birding seems to have given me a much better sense of shifting seasons than I’ve ever had in my life. I’m not sure that it has really given me a better feel for nature because I’ve been nature-oriented for many a year now, but it certainly feels that way.

Of course, looking back also makes me realize that I’ve gotten jaded while birding the last three years, with a constant need to see new things in new ways even though I try to avoid that feeling and simply remain aware.

I’ve seen a lot of Kildeer in the last three years, but I felt lucky to get as close as I did to this one, especially since he blended in so well with his background:

Kildeer

5 thoughts on “Third Anniversary

  1. Where we walk becomes part of our vast inner landscape. Thanks so much for sharing Nisqually. I used to see a white goose in with a flock of Canada Geese near Lake Whatcom in Bellingham. I wonder how many Canada Geese flocks include a white goose?

    I am particularly fond of killdeer, partly because of a children’s book published in 1945 called LITTLE KILLDEER, written by Ruth Wheeler with black and white photos by H.D. Wheeler and Ruth Wheeler, both members of the Audubon Society:

    http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0010-5422(194005/06)42:3%3C133:NHOTL%3E2.0.CO;2-V

What do you think?